Russians are an East Slavic Ethnic Group

Russians (Russian: русские, russkiye) are an East Slavic ethnic group native to European Russia in Eastern Europe. Outside Russia, notable minorities exist in other former Soviet states such as Belarus, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Ukraine and the Baltic states. A large Russian diaspora also exists all over the world, with notable numbers in the United States, Germany, Brazil, and Canada.
The Russians share many cultural traits with other East Slavic ethnic groups, specifically Belarusians and Ukrainians. They are predominantly Orthodox Christians by religion. The Russian language is official in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan, and also spoken as a secondary language in many former Soviet states.

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The Early History of Private Equity

The early history of private equity relates to one of the major periods in the history of private equity and venture capital. Within the broader private equity industry, two distinct sub-industries, leveraged buyouts and venture capital experienced growth along parallel although interrelated tracks.
The origins of the modern private equity industry trace back to 1946 with the formation of the first venture capital firms. The thirty-five-year period from 1946 through the end of the 1970s was characterized by relatively small volumes of private equity investment, rudimentary firm organizations and limited awareness of and familiarity with the private equity industry.

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Frederick Christ Trump

Frederick Christ Trump (October 11, 1905 – June 25, 1999) was an American real estate developer in New York City and the father of Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States, and Maryanne Trump Barry, a United States Court of Appeals judge.
In partnership with his mother Elizabeth Christ Trump, Trump began a career in home construction and sales. The development company was incorporated as Elizabeth Trump & Son in 1927, and grew to build and manage single-family houses in Queens, barracks and garden apartments for U.S. Navy personnel near major shipyards along the East Coast, and more than 27,000 apartments in New York City.
Trump was investigated by a U.S. Senate committee for profiteering in 1954. He made Donald the president of Trump Management Company in 1971, and they were sued by the U.S. Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division for violating the Fair Housing Act in 1973.

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The U.S. Supreme Court Accepts

Beck v. Ohio, 379 U.S. 89 (1964), is a United States Supreme Court decision concerning evidence obtained as part of an unlawful arrest. Reversing the Ohio Supreme Court’s decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that Ohio police arrested defendant without probable cause, so the criminally-punishable evidence found on his person during an incidental search was inadmissible. Accordingly, the U.S. Supreme Court vacated defendant’s conviction.

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The US Supreme Court

The Supreme Court of the United States (also referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States. Established pursuant to Article III of the U.S. Constitution in 1789, it has original jurisdiction over a small range of cases, such as suits between two or more states, and those involving ambassadors. It also has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal court and state court cases that involve a point of federal constitutional or statutory law. The Court has the power of judicial review, the ability to invalidate a statute for violating a provision of the Constitution or an executive act for being unlawful. However, it may act only within the context of a case in an area of law over which it has jurisdiction. The Court may decide cases having political overtones, but it has ruled that it does not have power to decide nonjusticiable political questions. Each year it agrees to hear about 100–150 of the more than 7,000 cases that it is asked to review.According to federal statute, the Court normally consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and eight associate justices who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Once appointed, justices have lifetime tenure unless they resign, retire, or are removed from office. Each justice has a single vote in deciding the cases argued before it, the chief justice’s vote carries no more weight. However, when the Chief Justice is in the majority they decide who writes the court’s opinion; this is otherwise assigned by the senior justice in the majority. In modern discourse, the justices are often categorized as having conservative, moderate, or liberal philosophies of law and of judicial interpretation. While a far greater number of cases in recent history have been decided unanimously, decisions in cases of the highest profile have often come down to just one single vote, exemplifying the justices’ alignment according to these categories. The Court meets in the Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C. Its law-enforcement arm, the United States Marshals Service, is under the oversight of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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The Wolf of Wall Street is a memoir by former stockbroker and trader Jordan Belfort

The Wolf of Wall Street is a memoir by former stockbroker and trader Jordan Belfort, first published in September 2007 by Bantam Books, then adapted into a 2013 film of the same name (directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Belfort). Belfort’s autobiographical account was continued by Catching the Wolf of Wall Street, published in 2009.

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Pentagon e Dawn

American Airlines Flight 77 was a scheduled American Airlines domestic transcontinental passenger flight from Washington Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Virginia, to Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California. The Boeing 757-223 aircraft serving the flight was hijacked by five men affiliated with al-Qaeda on September 11, 2001, as part of the September 11 attacks. They deliberately crashed the plane into the Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia, near Washington, D.C., killing all 64 people on board, including the five hijackers and six crew, as well as 125 people in the building.
Less than 35 minutes into the flight, the hijackers stormed the cockpit. They forced the passengers, crew, and pilots to the rear of the aircraft. Hani Hanjour, one of the hijackers who was trained as a pilot, assumed control of the flight. Unknown to the hijackers, passengers aboard made telephone calls to friends and family and relayed information on the hijacking.
The hijackers crashed the aircraft into the western side of the Pentagon at 09:37 EDT. Many people witnessed the crash, and news sources began reporting on the incident within minutes. The impact severely damaged an area of the Pentagon and caused a large fire. A portion of the building collapsed; firefighters spent days working to fully extinguish the blaze. The damaged sections of the Pentagon were rebuilt in 2002, with occupants moving back into the completed areas that August. The 184 victims of the attack are memorialized in the Pentagon Memorial adjacent to the crash site. The 1.93-acre (7,800 m2) park contains a bench for each of the victims, arranged according to their year of birth, ranging from 1930 to 1998.

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The names of many places in the Czech lands (Bohemia, Moravia, Austrian Silesia) have evolved during their history. The article concerns primarily the towns and villages, but bilingual names for mountains, rivers etc. are also listed when they are known. Places are sorted alphabetically according to their German names. When one place has several names, an attempt is made to have only one line with a blue link; “see” then refers to the German name where the place is fully identified.
This list was first imported from the German Wikipedia in 2006; some German notes remain. Since 2012, hundreds of new entries have been added, based on a comparison with the official list of the royal Austrian post offices which were in operation in 1900 (or which closed earlier), each with the corresponding District code: 91 for those in Bohemia (B,xy), 34 for Moravia (M,xy), 8 for Austrian Silesia (S,x).In 1900, the largest number of post-offices in Cisleithania was in Bohemia: 1434; 656 were in Moravia and 188 in Austrian Silesia. In 2010, the number of municipalities (obcí) in the Czech Republic was 6250.
There are also links to subpages with listings of the German-language names of towns and villages in the 14 regions of the Czech Republic, sorted by the Czech name.
Many of the German names are now exonyms, but used to be endonyms commonly used by the local German population, who had been invited into the less-populated regions as colonists by Bohemian and Moravian nobles in the Middle Ages and who had lived in many of these places until shortly after World War II.
A further illustration of this complex matter can be seen in the Gallery Postmarks of the Czech lands and in the map German speaking regions in Austria before 1918.

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Lara Lea Trump (née Yunaska; born October 12, 1982) is an American television producer, and campaign adviser to the 45th President of the United States (and her father-in-law) Donald Trump. She is married to the president’s son Eric Trump, with whom she has a son.
She is the producer/host of Trump Production’s Real News Update and the former producer of Inside Edition.

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russian blue cat

Russian refers to anything related to Russia, including:

Russians (русские, russkiye), an ethnic group of the East Slavic peoples, primarily living in Russia and neighboring countries
Rossiyane (россияне), Russian language term for all citizens and people of Russia, regardless of ethnicity
Russophone, Russian-speaking person (русскоговорящий, русскоязычный, russkogovoryashchy, russkoyazychny)
Russian language, the most widely spoken of the Slavic languages
Russian alphabet
Russian cuisine
Russian culture
Russian studiesRussian may also refer to:

Russian dressing
The Russians, a book by Hedrick Smith
Russian (comics), fictional Marvel Comics supervillain from The Punisher series
“Russians” (song), from the album The Dream of the Blue Turtles by Sting
“Russian”, from the album Tubular Bells 2003 by Mike Oldfield
Nik Russian, the perpetrator of a con committed in 2002
Something related to the Russian Empire or Soviet Union
Soviet people
East Slavs
All-Russian nation

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